Indigenous geographies II: The aspirational spaces in postcolonial politics - reconciliation, belonging and social provision

Brad Coombes*, Jay T. Johnson, Richard Howitt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Required to negotiate a transcultural present in which their rights and opportunities are circumscribed by the pleadings of multicultural others, Indigenous peoples have attracted attention for their approaches to alliance-building, responsible co-existence and self-determined care. In this second report on Indigenous geographies1, we associate those projects with the geographies of hope but, recognizing that a futuristic gaze on allegedly progressive cases can lapse into naivety, we call for further postcolonial critique of the influences on those cases. We distinguish retrospective and prospective applications of postcolonial theory, suggesting that while geographers initially disregarded the latter they now exaggerate that outlook in hopeful advocacy for Indigenous alternatives. Nonetheless, we conclude with examples of reconciliation and Indigenous service provision which attest to the social significance and aspirational character of Indigenous responses, both from the margins and in the focus of everyday politics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)691-700
Number of pages10
JournalProgress in Human Geography
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

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