INdigenous Systems and Policies Improved and Reimagined for Ear and hearing care (INSPIRE): a multi-method study protocol

Kai Nash, Kylie Gwynne, Yvonne Dimitropoulos, Mark Fitzpatrick, Hasantha Gunasekera, Luke Halvorsen, Kelvin Kong, Noeleen Lumby, Rona Macniven, Carmen Parter, Amanda Wingett, Catherine McMahon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introduction: Otitis media (middle ear disease) severity and chronicity among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, as well as gaps in socioeconomic outcomes related to hearing loss, indicates a breakdown in the current ear and hearing care system. The ear and hearing care system spans multiple sectors due to long-term impacts of otitis media and hearing loss in health, education and employment, necessitating a multi-disciplinary cross-sectorial approach to ear and hearing care. Public policies shape the current ear and hearing care system and here it is argued that a critical public policy analysis across different sectors is needed, with strong Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership and guidance. The current study aims to establish consensus-based ear and hearing care policy solutions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia.

Methods and analysis: This multi-method study will be guided by a Brains Trust with strong Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leadership. Public policies in hearing health, social services, and education will be scoped to identify policy gaps, using the World Health Organization framework. Qualitative data will be collected through a culturally specific process of yarning circles to identify policy challenges and/or limitations in enabling accessible ear and hearing care programs/services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, using dimensions of Morestin's public policy appraisal tool as an interview guide for stakeholders. Themes from the yarning circles will be used to inform an expert Delphi process to establish consensus-based policy solutions for optimising the ear and hearing care system for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Ethics and dissemination: This study has approval from the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Ethics Committee. Study findings will be disseminated to community through Brains Trust members and study participants, as well as through publications in peer-reviewed journals and research forum presentations.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere079850
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalBMJ Open
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jan 2024

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2024. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Humans
  • Australia
  • Hearing
  • Public Policy
  • Deafness
  • Otitis Media/therapy

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'INdigenous Systems and Policies Improved and Reimagined for Ear and hearing care (INSPIRE): a multi-method study protocol'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this