Injury severity, age and pre-injury exercise history predict adherence to a home-based exercise programme in adults with traumatic brain injury

Leanne M. Hassett, Robyn L. Tate, Anne M. Moseley, Lauren E. Gillett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To explore factors that may influence exercise adherence in adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) theoretical model. Participants: Thirty participants with TBI who had been randomized to a home-based exercise programme in a recently conducted randomized controlled trial. Methods: Impairments in body functions, environmental factors and personal factors were explored as predictors for exercise adherence. Significant variables were entered into binary logistic regression analyses to determine their combined power to predict exercise adherence. Results: Greater injury severity, older age and a pre-injury exercise history of walking or jogging positively influenced exercise adherence. As a combined set the three predictor variables accurately classified 82% of participants as adherent or non-adherent and were able to explain 49% of the variance (sensitivity=67%; specificity=89%). Conclusion: These results demonstrate people with severe injuries are able to exercise independently and suggest that in order to maximize adherence to an exercise programme, clinicians need to consider exercise history when prescribing the type of exercise. The results also provide factors within the ICF theoretical model to investigate in a large-scale study of exercise adherence after TBI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)698-706
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Injury
Volume25
Issue number7-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • brain injuries
  • Exercise
  • patient compliance
  • physical therapy (specialty)

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