Interpretations of Uptalk in Australian English: low confidence, unfinished speech, and variability within and between listeners

Elise Tobin*, Titia Benders

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to determine Australian English (AusE) listeners’ interpretations of uptalk, produced by a female AusE speaker. A rating task compared interpretations of uptalk and falling contour utterances. The results indicated that uptalk is perceived to convey lower confidence, reduced emphasis and clarity, and unfinished speech compared to falling contours. Female listeners provided lower Finality ratings for uptalk, compared to male listeners. Confidence and Finality uptalk
ratings were variable within listeners. Results are discussed in light of varying listeners’ interpretations, and the external and listener-internal factors that may impact uptalk interpretations
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 17th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology
Subtitle of host publicationSST-2018
EditorsJulien Epps, Joe Wolfe, John Smith, Caroline Jones
Place of PublicationCanberra, ACT
PublisherAustralasian Speech Science and Technology Association (ASSTA)
Pages9-12
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventAustralasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (17th : 2018) - Coogee, Sydney, Australia
Duration: 4 Dec 20187 Dec 2018

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology
ISSN (Electronic)2207-1296

Conference

ConferenceAustralasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (17th : 2018)
Abbreviated titleSST2018
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CitySydney
Period4/12/187/12/18

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