Intersections: a paradigm for languages and cultures?

Jean Fornasiero*, Sarah M.A. Reed, Rob Amery, Eric Bouvet, Kayoko Enomoto, Hui Ling Xu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

“Intersections” constitutes the thematic thread to the essays in this volume, whose aim is to depict the multi-facetted yet cohesive nature of Australian scholarship and practice in Language Studies. Running discreetly through all chapters, featuring prominently in some, this thread connects them all to a lived reality: the field of languages and cultures, as it is practised and reflected upon in Australian universities today, is essentially an interdisciplinary and interconnecting space, one in which linguistic and disciplinary diversities meet and gather forces. Although language scholars are well equipped to navigate that space, the issue that currently confronts them is that their universities do not necessarily recognize or reward what is a positive contribution to their institutional mission. In this volume, they collectively make a compelling case for their inclusion.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIntersections in language planning and policy
Subtitle of host publicationestablishing connections in languages and cultures
EditorsJean Fornasiero, Sarah M. A. Reed, Rob Amery, Eric Bouvet, Kayoko Enomoto, Hui Ling Xu
Place of PublicationCham, Switzerland
PublisherSpringer, Springer Nature
Pages3-14
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9783030509255
ISBN (Print)9783030509248
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Publication series

NameLanguage Policy
PublisherSpringer
Volume23
ISSN (Print)1571-5361
ISSN (Electronic)2452-1027

Keywords

  • Australian universities
  • Collaboration
  • Community engagement
  • Community-of-practice
  • Connectedness
  • Interculturality
  • Interdisciplinarity
  • Intersections
  • Language studies

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