Interspecies sexual conflict

evidence of interspecies sexual mimicry in a sympatric pair of traumatically inseminating insects

N. Tatarnic

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Sexual conflict is widely accepted as a significant evolutionary driver, which can fuel coevolutionary arms races between the sexes and may even lead to speciation. In the traumatically inseminating plant bug genus Coridromius, mating is aggressive and fast, with males pouncing on unsuspecting females, and females thrashing, kicking and jumping in an effort to dislodge their would-be suitors. Here I report the discovery of two sister species of Coridromius living sympatrically on the same host plants in Tahiti, and present evidence of interspecies sexual mimicry, thought to be driven by reproductive interference.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventAnnual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America (60th : 2012) - Knoxville, TN
Duration: 11 Nov 201214 Nov 2012

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America (60th : 2012)
CityKnoxville, TN
Period11/11/1214/11/12

Keywords

  • Mimicry
  • Sympatric populations
  • Conflicts
  • Aquatic insects
  • Insects

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