Interview scores correlate with fellow microsurgical skill and performance

Mark V. Schaverien, Charles E. Butler, Hiroo Suami, Patrick B. Garvey, Jun Liu, Jesse C. Selber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: The interview process for surgical trainees aims to select those individuals who will perform best during training and have the greatest potential as future surgeons. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between criteria assessed at interview, technical skills, and performance, for the first time, to optimize the selection process for a Microsurgery fellowship. 

Methods: Twenty microsurgery fellows in three consecutive annual cohorts at a single academic center were prospectively evaluated. At interview, subjects were scored for multiple standardized domains. At the start and at end of the fellowship, microsurgical technical skill was assessed both in the laboratory and operating room (OR) using a validated assessment tool. At the end of the fellowship, there was a final evaluation of performance. 

Results: At the start, microsurgical skill significantly correlated with almost all domains evaluated at interview, most closely with prior plastic surgery training experience. At the end of the fellowship, skill level improved in all trainees, with the greatest improvement made by the lowest ranked and skilled trainees. The highest ranked trainees, however, made the greatest improvement in speed. 

Conclusions: The results of this study, for the first time, validate the current interview process to correctly select the highest performing and most skilled candidates and support the effectiveness of a 1-year microsurgical fellowship in improving microsurgical skill in all trainees, irrespective of their initial ability. The importance of valuing the relative quality of prior training and experience at selection is also highlighted.

LanguageEnglish
Pages211-217
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Reconstructive Microsurgery
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

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Interviews
Microsurgery
Plastic Surgery
Operating Rooms

Keywords

  • assessment
  • fellow
  • microsurgery

Cite this

Schaverien, Mark V. ; Butler, Charles E. ; Suami, Hiroo ; Garvey, Patrick B. ; Liu, Jun ; Selber, Jesse C. / Interview scores correlate with fellow microsurgical skill and performance. In: Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery. 2018 ; Vol. 34, No. 3. pp. 211-217.
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Interview scores correlate with fellow microsurgical skill and performance. / Schaverien, Mark V.; Butler, Charles E.; Suami, Hiroo; Garvey, Patrick B.; Liu, Jun; Selber, Jesse C.

In: Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery, Vol. 34, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 211-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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