Intravenous pamidronate treatment in children with moderate-to-severe osteogenesis imperfecta started under three years of age

M. B. Alcausin, J. Briody, V. Pacey, J. Ault, M. McQuade, C. Bridge, R. H H Engelbert, D. O. Sillence, C. F. Munns

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26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Evaluate clinical outcome of early cyclic intravenous pamidronate treatment in children with moderate-to-severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), commenced before three years of age. Methods: A retrospective review of 17 patients with moderate-to-severe OI. Development, anthropometry, fracture history, bone mineral density (BMD) and biochemistry were collected at baseline, 12 and 24 months. Results: Four had OI type I, eleven had type III, one OI-FKBP10 type and one OI type V. Mean age at start of pamidronate was 14 ± 11 months. Pamidronate ranged from 6 to 12 mg/kg/year. No adverse reaction apart from fever and vomiting was noted. Long bone fracture decreased from a mean of 10.4/year to 1.2/year after 12 months and 1.4/year after 24 months (p = 0.02). Lumbar spine age- and height-matched BMD Z-scores increased (p < 0.005). Sixteen with vertebral compression fractures at baseline all showed improved vertebral shape (p < 0.001). Concavity index, likewise, improved (p < 0.005). Motor milestones compared to historical data show earlier attainment in rolling over, crawling, pulling to stand and walking independently but not sitting. Conclusion: Cyclic intravenous pamidronate, started under 3 years of age in children with moderate-to-severe OI, was well tolerated and associated with an increase in lumbar spine BMD, reduced fracture frequency, vertebral remodelling and attainment of motor milestones at an earlier age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)333-340
Number of pages8
JournalHormone Research in Paediatrics
Volume79
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013
Externally publishedYes

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