Introduction to the Special Issue on Training Psychologists and Nonpsychologists in Cognitive and Behavioural Procedures

Brian G. Kearney*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article introduces a special collection of papers that discuss issues in training nonpsychologists and psychologists in behavioural and cognitive procedures. It is argued that while this has been a neglected issue, it is an important strategy in achieving the overall goal of the large-scale dissemination of cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT), a stated aim of the Australian Behaviour Modification Association and like organisations. It is proposed that to successfully train nonpsychologists in CBT a number of conceptual issues need to be clarified. The first concerns the nature of CBT; it is argued that CBT is not an entity in itself, but the process of applying the science of psychology to human problems. Second, CBT knowledge is a continuum, with various levels of complexity. Therefore attempts to train nonpsychologists need to consider the trainees' level of psychological knowledge in determining the goals of training. Needs for (a) a comprehensive conceptual framework to guide the training of nonpsychologists, (b) research to identify the best ways of accomplishing training, and (c) “top-down” strategies, such as changing service-system philosophies, to complement the “bottom-up” strategy of training individuals, are highlighted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalBehaviour Change
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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