Investigating longitudinal and bidirectional relationships between parental factors and time spent on social media during early adolescence

Jasmine Fardouly*, Natasha R. Magson, Ronald M. Rapee, Ella L. Oar, Carly J. Johnco, Cele Richardson, Justin Freeman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
25 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This three-wave panel study examined the prospective and bidirectional relationships between parental control of social media use, and parents’ and adolescents’ perceived time spent on social media over a 2-year period. Adolescents (52% males, T1: Mage = 12.19, SD = 0.52) and one of their parents (96% mothers, T1: Mage = 45.26, SD = 4.28) completed annual surveys (T1: N = 498, T2: N = 477 and T3: N = 440). Data were analysed using cross-lagged panel models. More adolescent time spent on social media predicted small decreases in parental control 1 year later, but parental control did not predict adolescent time on social media. More parental time spent on social media predicted small increases in adolescent time spent on social media 1 year later, but adolescent use did not predict parent use. Examining factors related to parental use, rather than restriction, may be more effective to reduce adolescents’ social media use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1610–1626
Number of pages17
JournalNew Media and Society
Volume26
Issue number3
Early online date8 Feb 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2024

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • parental modelling
  • parenting
  • restrictive mediation
  • social media

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