Investigating the effect of model type and practice format on performance expectations and actual physical performance

Jennifer Cumming*, Richard Ramsey

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on social cognitive theory, we tested the effects of model type (mastery vs. coping) and form of practice (physical, imagery, or none) on performance expectations (self-efficacy and perceived task difficulty) and balance on a stabilometer task. After obtaining baseline measures, 78 participants viewed either mastery or coping demonstrations of the task and practiced according to their allocated condition for 3 minutes. Following practice, all measures were assessed for a second time. Physical practice improved actual performance more than imagery and no practice. In support of social cognitive theory, physical and imagery practice raised self-efficacy beliefs, but only physical practice made the task seem easier to perform. Model type did not influence performance. We show that inflated estimates of physical ability following imagery, which are discordant with one's actual ability (estimation inflation), are not based on false perceptions of task difficulty. Our data concur with other studies that report no advantage of using a coping model over a mastery model when improving performance of a novel motor task.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-283
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • observational practice
  • imagery
  • stabilometer balancing
  • self-efficacy
  • performance

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