Ionic liquid solvents: the importance of microscopic interactions in predicting organic reaction outcomes

Sinead T. Keaveney*, Ronald S. Haines, Jason B. Harper

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)
13 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Ionic liquids are attractive alternatives to molecular solvents as they have many favourable physical properties and can produce different organic reaction outcomes compared to molecular solvents. Thus far, interactions between the ionic liquid components and specific sites (such as charged centres, lone pairs and π systems) on the reagents and transition state have been identified as affecting reaction outcome; a comprehensive understanding of these interactions is necessary to allow prediction of ionic liquid solvent effects. This manuscript summarises our recent progress in the development of a framework for predicting the effect of an ionic liquid solvent on the outcome of organic processes. There will be a particular focus on the importance of the different interactions between the ionic liquid components and the species along the reaction coordinate that are responsible for the changes in reaction outcome observed in the cases described.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)745-757
Number of pages13
JournalPure and Applied Chemistry
Volume89
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Jun 2017
Externally publishedYes
Event23rd IUPAC Conference on Physical Organic Chemistry - Sydney, Australia
Duration: 3 Jul 20168 Jul 2016

Bibliographical note

Copyright 2017 IUPAC & De Gruyter. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Activation parameters
  • ICPOC-23
  • Ionic liquids
  • Organic reactions
  • Rate constants
  • Solvent effects

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