Is penetrating injury on the increase in South-Western Sydney?

S. Sidhu*, M. Sugrue, A. Bauman, D. Sloane, S. Deane

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Few Australian studies describe the epidemiology of penetrating trauma. This study describes the incidence and demographic features of penetrating injuries with emphasis on trends and severity analysis. Methods: Case analysis was performed utilizing data from the Liverpool Hospital Trauma Registry (1989-94), NSW Department of Health Hospital Separations (1991-93), and the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics (1991-93) with reference to the Liverpool and Fairfield Local Government Areas (LGA). Results: The Trauma Registry revealed 251 of penetrating trauma. The median age was 26 years (interquartile range 21-33). Ninety-one per cent of the victims were male. Fourteen per cent of patients had an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15. Sixty-five per cent of cases were stab injuries and 20% gunshot injuries with the abdomen being the most commonly injured site. Twenty-one per cent of patients underwent laparotomy, 1.6% thoracotomy and 1.2% thoracotomy and laparotomy. There were 10 (4%) deaths. Trends in incidence of penetrating trauma and violent crime involving weapons were analysed. Static trends were observed for the annual incidence of penetrating trauma from the Liverpool Hospital Trauma Registry. Separations for penetrating trauma from Liverpool and Fairfield hospitals showed a slightly increasing trend. Violent crimes involving weapons in the Liverpool and Fairfield LGA showed a static trend. Nevertheless, separations for penetrating trauma and rates of violent crimes involving weapons were higher in south-western Sydney than metropolitan Sydney or NSW. Eight per cent of the LGA population are Vietnamese but this study identified 16% of victims as being Vietnamese. Conclusions: This study found no significant increase in penetrating trauma or violent crime predisposing to penetrating injury in south-western Sydney.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-539
Number of pages5
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery
Volume66
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • gunshot wounds
  • penetrating wounds
  • stab wounds

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