Is specialized integrated treatment for comorbid anxiety, depression and alcohol dependence better than treatment as usual in a public hospital setting?

K. C. Morley, A. Baillie, S. Leung, C. Sannibale, M. Teesson, P. S. Haber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To assess the effectiveness of a 12 week specialized, integrated intervention for alcohol dependence with comorbid anxiety and/or mood disorder using a randomized design in an outpatient hospital setting. Methods: Out of 86 patients meeting the inclusion criteria for alcohol dependence with suspicion of comorbid anxiety and/or depressive disorder, 57 completed a 3-week stabilization period (abstinence or significantly reduced consumption). Of these patients, 37 (65%) met a formal diagnostic assessment of an anxiety and/or depressive disorder and were randomized to either (a) integrated intervention (cognitive behavioural therapy) for alcohol, anxiety and/or depression, or (b) usual counselling care for alcohol problems. Results: Intention-to-treat analyses revealed a beneficial treatment effect of integrated treatment relative to usual counselling care for the number of days to relapse (χ2 = 6.42, P <0.05) and lapse (χ2 = 10.73, P <0.01). In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of treatment and time for percentage days of abstinence (P <0.05). For heavy drinking days, the treatment effect was mediated by changes in DASS anxiety (P <0.05). There were no significant treatment interaction effects for DASS depression or anxiety symptoms. Conclusions: These results provide support for integrated care in improving drinking outcomes for patients with alcohol dependence and comorbid depression/anxiety disorder.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)402-409
Number of pages8
JournalAlcohol and Alcoholism
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2016

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