Isis as the embodiment of nature in ancient Rome

how gardens within ancient Roman temples celebrated memories of Egypt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

When after the Battle of Actium Egypt was incorporated into the Roman Empire, the intellectual elite of ancient Rome decided on a distinct take on ancient Egypt, usually referred to as interpretatio Romana. As access to ancient Egyptian theology was restricted and not available outside Egypt, the Roman memory of what was regarded as being the essence of Egyptian thinking was based on a limited number of key aspects that were successfully Romanised. The element of nature, constantly rejuvenating itself but in its origins only comprehensible to those close to the divine became a key feature of the expanded look on life and the beyond provided through the mysteries of Isis. The Iseum Campense served as the centre in which the memory of Egypt was shaped, negotiated and displayed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Iseum Campense from the Roman Empire to the modern age
Subtitle of host publicationtemple – monument – lieu de mémoire: proceedings of the international conference held in Rome at the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome (KNIR), the Accademia di Danimarca, and the Accademia d'Egitto, May 25-27 2016
EditorsMiguel John Versluys, Kristine Bülow Clausen, Giuseppina Capriotti Vittozzi
Place of PublicationRome
PublisherEdizioni Qasar
Pages99-111
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9788871409269
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes
EventThe Iseum Campense from the Roman Empire to the Modern Age: historical, archaeological, and historiographical perspectives - Rome, Italy
Duration: 25 May 201627 May 2016

Publication series

NamePapers of the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome
PublisherEdizioni Quasar
Volume66

Conference

ConferenceThe Iseum Campense from the Roman Empire to the Modern Age
CountryItaly
CityRome
Period25/05/1627/05/16

Keywords

  • Isis Religion
  • cultural memory
  • museum studies
  • Archaeology
  • Garden Studies
  • Ancient Rome

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  • Cite this

    Bommas, M. (2018). Isis as the embodiment of nature in ancient Rome: how gardens within ancient Roman temples celebrated memories of Egypt. In M. J. Versluys, K. B. Clausen, & G. Capriotti Vittozzi (Eds.), The Iseum Campense from the Roman Empire to the modern age: temple – monument – lieu de mémoire: proceedings of the international conference held in Rome at the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome (KNIR), the Accademia di Danimarca, and the Accademia d'Egitto, May 25-27 2016 (pp. 99-111). (Papers of the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome ; Vol. 66). Rome: Edizioni Qasar.