It's all about control: The role of self-control in buffering the effects of negative reciprocity beliefs and trait anger on workplace deviance

Simon Lloyd D. Restubog*, Patrick Raymund James M. Garcia, Lu Wang, David Cheng

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drawing upon the general aggression model, general theory of crime, and the integrative cognitive model of trait anger, we examined the role of self-control in buffering the effects of negative reciprocity beliefs and trait anger on workplace deviance. A total of 125 employees participated in the study. Results supported the hypothesized direct effects of negative reciprocity beliefs, trait anger, and self-control on archival data on workplace deviance. In addition, self-control moderated these relationships. Specifically, there was a weaker positive relationship between negative reciprocity beliefs, trait anger and workplace deviance for employees with high as opposed to low levels of self-control. These findings supported the view that self-control can override predispositions to engage in deviant behaviors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)655-660
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • aggression
  • individual differences
  • negative reciprocity
  • self-control
  • trait anger

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