It's not as bad as they thought: student preferences for teaching format across subjects and over time

Suzan Burton, Paul Nesbit

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Block (or intensive) teaching is used by many management schools, but the factors that drive students to choose (or avoid) block subjects are not well understood. This study analyses the factors which predict the choices of post-graduate business students between different teaching formats, based on a survey of students with varying experience with different teaching format and with post-graduate study. The results draw on a sample of 1089 students, with a response rate of 86.7%. The results show the limitations of previous research into block teaching, which has typically analysed students’ reactions to one subject in isolation, which may present a misleading impression of student preferences under typical study conditions. The results also show a typical patter of resistance to the block format by less experienced students, and increasing preference for block teaching as students become more familiar with the format. However for one financial course, and potentially for other subjects with a similar quantitative focus, student preference for block teaching remained low. Implications for block scheduling and for actions to address perceived disadvantages of the block method are addressed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe quantitative analysis of teaching and learning in higher education in business, economics and commerce
Subtitle of host publicationforum proceedings
EditorsMartin Davies, Sanchia Draper
Place of PublicationMelbourne
PublisherUniversity of Melbourne, Faculty of Economics and Commerce, Teaching and Learning Unit
Pages79-94
Number of pages16
ISBN (Print)9780734039064
Publication statusPublished - 2008
EventQuantitative Analysis of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education in Business, Economics and Commerce, Forum - Melbourne
Duration: 8 Feb 20088 Feb 2008

Conference

ConferenceQuantitative Analysis of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education in Business, Economics and Commerce, Forum
CityMelbourne
Period8/02/088/02/08

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