"It's not what they say but the way they say it". A content analysis of interpreter and consumer perceptions towards signed language interpreting in Australia

Jemina Napier*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    19 Citations (Scopus)
    45 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This paper presents findings of an innovative study, which involved the thematic and content analyses of discussions held by deaf people, hearing people and interpreters about signed language interpreting in Australia. Six focus groups yielded eight hours of data, which was analyzed to identify themes that emerged about participants' perceptions about interpreters and interpreting. Examples are given to compare how participants view the signed language interpreting profession, and to discuss the expectations of all parties of signed language interpreter-mediated encounters. The focus of analysis is on key themes that were evident from the most frequently used words/signs. The findings provide a clearer understanding of the relationship between consumers and interpreters, and attitudes towards signed language interpreters and interpreting in Australia.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)59-87
    Number of pages29
    JournalInternational Journal of the Sociology of Language
    Issue number207
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

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