Jumping to delusions? Paranoia, probabilistic reasoning, and need for closure

Ryan McKay*, Robyn Langdon, Max Coltheart

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction. The present study was designed to replicate and extend the findings of Bentall and Swarbrick (2003). It was hypothesised that patients with a history of persecutory delusions would display higher need for closure and a more extreme jumping to conclusions bias than healthy control participants. Methods. Twenty-two patients with a history of persecutory delusions and nineteen healthy control participants were administered a probabilistic reasoning task, along with self-report measures of depression and need for closure. Results. The clinical group scored higher on need for closure than the controls, but showed no greater tendency to jump to conclusions. No relationship was found between need for closure and a jumping to conclusions bias. Conclusions. The results confirm an association between persecutory delusions and need for closure, yet suggest that persecutory delusions in an outpatient sample can be seen in the absence of a jumping to conclusions bias.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)362-376
Number of pages15
JournalCognitive Neuropsychiatry
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007

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