Kinaesthetic acuity and motor skills of preschool children with a congenital visual impairment preliminary findings

Shirley R. Wyver*, David J. Livesey

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper presents the preliminary findings of a study examining the impact of congenital visual impairment on the development of motor skills and kinaesthetic acuity. Studies of children with a visual impairment have consistently noted deficits in motor development. It was hypothesised that these deficits may be linked with poor kinaesthetic sensitivity. Six preschool children with a visual impairment (mean age 55.17 months) were compared to nine classmates (mean age 56.67 months) matched for age, gender, and general verbal ability, on modified tasks from the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC) and the Kinaesthetic Acuity Test (KAT). Although the difference between groups was significant for one task only (static balance), it was noted that all differences observed were in the hypothesised direction. Further longitudinal or cross-sectional data are required to provide a more comprehensive analysis of the relationship between vision impairment, kinaesthetic development, and motor skills.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)72-79
    Number of pages8
    JournalAustralian Educational and Developmental Psychologist
    Volume14
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 1997

    Keywords

    • blindness
    • kinaesthetic acuity
    • motor development
    • visual impairment (VI)

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