Klotho allele status is not associated with Aβ and APOE ε4–related cognitive decline in preclinical Alzheimer's disease

Tenielle Porter, Samantha C. Burnham, Lidija Milicic, Greg Savage, Paul Maruff, Yen Ying Lim, David Ames, Colin L. Masters, Ralph N. Martins, Stephanie Rainey-Smith, Christopher C. Rowe, Olivier Salvado, David Groth, Giuseppe Verdile, Victor L. Villemagne, Simon M. Laws*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The longevity gene Klotho (KL), specifically the functional KL-VS variant, has previously been associated with cognition and rates of cognitive decline. This study aimed to determine whether KL-VS associations with cognition were observable in preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD). The study also aimed to determine whether there was a combined influence of KL-VS, neocortical amyloid-β (Aβ) burden, and carriage of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele on cognitive decline. This study involved 581 Aβ-imaged, cognitively normal older adults, enrolled in the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study of Aging. Linear mixed effects models revealed no significant associations between KL-VS and cognitive decline independently or in combination with Aβ burden and APOE ε4 genotype. Overall, previous associations reported between KL-VS and cognitive decline are not observed at the preclinical stages of AD. Furthermore, the results do not support the hypothesis that KL-VS has a modifying effect on Aβ burden and APOE ε4–driven cognitive decline in preclinical AD.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)162-165
    Number of pages4
    JournalNeurobiology of Aging
    Volume76
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

    Keywords

    • Klotho
    • KL-VS
    • cognition
    • episodic memory
    • amyloid-β
    • preclinical
    • Alzheimer’s disease

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