Knowing-doing gaps in the ICT workplace

Gender and culture

Debbie Richards*, Peter Busch

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Knowledge that is not applied, results in a 'knowing-doing gap'. While education, training and knowledge management practices will affect what we know; how, when and with whom we use that knowledge will be mediated by cultural influences at the societal, organizational, group and individual levels. Based on a study involving 119 ICT workers in multicultural Australia, we found patterns of knowledge usage behaviour using a psychology-based scenario approach across a number of gender and culture-based cohorts: Male, Female, Anglo, Non English Speaking Background, Western and Eastern. In this paper we focus particularly on the results of statistical analysis of the data by gender and culture to compare 'ethical' (should do) responses with their corresponding 'realistic' (will do) responses.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication19th European Conference on Information Systems, ECIS 2011
Place of PublicationUSA
PublisherAssociation for Information Systems
Pages1-12
Number of pages12
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Event19th European Conference on Information Systems - ICT and Sustainable Service Development, ECIS 2011 - Helsinki, Finland
Duration: 9 Jun 201111 Jun 2011

Other

Other19th European Conference on Information Systems - ICT and Sustainable Service Development, ECIS 2011
CountryFinland
CityHelsinki
Period9/06/1111/06/11

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