“Knowing that I’m not necessarily alone in my struggles”: UK autistic performing arts professionals’ experiences of a mentoring programme

Eleanor Buckley*, Elizabeth Pellicano, Anna Remington

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
18 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This research examined whether professional mentoring could have a positive effect on the occupational self-efficacy of autistic performing arts professionals. We compared the outcomes of one group who received mentoring to a waitlist control group. 26 participants took part in this study: 15 autistic mentees and 11 mentors, three of whom were also autistic. The mentoring programme was well received and felt to be beneficial by the participating mentees and mentors, particularly regarding gains in mentees’ occupational self-efficacy. Professional mentoring also addressed several work-oriented challenges identified by autistic performing arts professionals such as feelings of isolation in the industry and need for consultation and advice on both a professional level, and for mentees with autistic mentors, also a neurodivergent one.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5451–5470
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume52
Issue number12
Early online date29 Dec 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2021. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • autism
  • employment
  • mentoring
  • support
  • arts

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