Knowledge management and the performing arts industry: The case of Australia's SCOPE initiative

Elizabeth More*, Shane Carroll, Kay Foss

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to outline one innovative Australian initiative to harness creative, often intangible, knowledge, and reap the benefits of the intellectual capital of dance artists both during and post performing careers the project Securing Career Opportunities and Professional Employment (SCOPE) which has been running for the last three years in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS). Design/methodology/ approach - Unlike much of the work in the field of knowledge management that concentrates on individual organization knowledge management processes and practices, this paper takes an industry-sector-wide perspective, utilizing written, and oral data sources. Findings - International focus on innovation, entrepreneurship, creativity and knowledge management has led to a growing recognition of the role of the creative industries for our post industrial economic well being. Dance plays a central role as a unique way of knowing and learning, with both intrinsic and instrumental value. Whilst there is diversity among dance artists, one unifying feature is short careers as performers. Having amassed an array of special attributes and competencies that are beneficial, it is crucial for artists to manage the knowledge gained through their training and careers in order to sustain and reap the benefits of their intellectual capital. The creative value of dance artists' capabilities can be a beacon in the link between creativity and economic outcomes. SCOPE is especially innovative as, unlike other programs, it moves beyond the notion of a transition program to emphasizing that of career development and sector knowledge management. Originality/value - The research case study approach contributes to a fuller understanding of a very under researched area first, that of management in the performing arts; and second, in knowledge management within an industry sector.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-53
Number of pages14
JournalAsia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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