Labour force participation and employment of humanitarian migrants: Evidence from the Building a New Life in Australia longitudinal data

Zhiming Cheng*, Ben Zhe Wang, Lucy Taksa

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study uses the longitudinal data from the Building a New Life in Australia survey to examine the relationships between human capital and labour market participation and employment status among recently arrived/approved humanitarian migrants. We find that the likelihood of participating in the labour force is higher for those who had pre-immigration paid job experience, completed study/job training and have better job searching knowledge/skills in Australia and possess higher proficiency in spoken English. We find that the chance of getting a paid job is negatively related to having better pre-immigration education, but it is positively related to having unpaid work experience and job searching skills in Australia, and better health. We also explore the ethical implications of the findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)697–720
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
Volume168
Issue number4
Early online date1 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Employment status
  • Human capital
  • Humanitarian migrant
  • Labour force participation
  • Settlement

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Labour force participation and employment of humanitarian migrants: Evidence from the Building a New Life in Australia longitudinal data'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this