Landmark-based spatial memory in birds (Parus atricapillus and Columba livia): the use of edges and distances to represent spatial positions

K. Cheng, D. F. Sherry

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    67 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Black-capped chickadees and pigeons searched for hidden food. In each task the target was near an edge with a nearby landmark. On occasional unrewarded tests the landmark was either left in its usual position, shifted parallel to the edge, shifted perpendicular to the edge, or shifted diagonally. On diagonal landmark shifts the birds shifted their searching more in the parallel direction than in the perpendicular. In some cases birds maintained their searching at a constant perpendicular distance under all landmark shifts. This suggests that perpendicular distance to an edge forms an element in determining where to search on the basis of landmarks. Chickadees and pigeons performed similarly, which suggests similarity in the way they encode locations. -from Authors

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)331-341
    Number of pages11
    JournalJournal of Comparative Psychology
    Volume106
    Issue number4
    Publication statusPublished - 1992

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