Language development in deaf or hard-of-hearing children with additional disabilities: type matters!

L. Cupples, T. Y.C. Ching, G. Leigh, L. Martin, M. Gunnourie, L. Button, V. Marnane, S. Hou, V. Zhang, C. Flynn, P. Van Buynder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: This study examined language development in young children with hearing loss and different types of additional disabilities (ADs). Method: A population-based cohort of 67 children who were enrolled in the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment study took part. Language ability was directly assessed at 3 and 5 years of age using the Preschool Language Scale, Fourth Edition and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Fourth Edition. Standard scores were used to enable comparison with age-based expectations for typically developing children. Results: Analysis of variance showed that, across the total cohort, children's language scores remained stable over the 2-year period. However, this overall stability masked a significant difference between children with different types of ADs; in particular, children with autism, cerebral palsy and/or developmental delay showed a decline in standard scores, whereas children with other disabilities showed a relative improvement. In addition, larger improvements in receptive vocabulary were associated with use of oral communication only. Conclusions: The results suggest that type of AD can be used to gauge expected language development in the population of children with hearing loss and ADs when formal assessment of cognitive ability is not feasible.

LanguageEnglish
Pages532-543
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume62
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018

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Language Development
Disabled Children
Hearing
Hearing Loss
Aptitude
Language
Language Tests
Child Language
Vocabulary
Cerebral Palsy
Autistic Disorder
Deaf
Population
Analysis of Variance
Communication
Hearing Impairment

Cite this

Cupples, L. ; Ching, T. Y.C. ; Leigh, G. ; Martin, L. ; Gunnourie, M. ; Button, L. ; Marnane, V. ; Hou, S. ; Zhang, V. ; Flynn, C. ; Van Buynder, P./ Language development in deaf or hard-of-hearing children with additional disabilities : type matters!. In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research. 2018 ; Vol. 62, No. 6. pp. 532-543
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abstract = "Background: This study examined language development in young children with hearing loss and different types of additional disabilities (ADs). Method: A population-based cohort of 67 children who were enrolled in the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment study took part. Language ability was directly assessed at 3 and 5 years of age using the Preschool Language Scale, Fourth Edition and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Fourth Edition. Standard scores were used to enable comparison with age-based expectations for typically developing children. Results: Analysis of variance showed that, across the total cohort, children's language scores remained stable over the 2-year period. However, this overall stability masked a significant difference between children with different types of ADs; in particular, children with autism, cerebral palsy and/or developmental delay showed a decline in standard scores, whereas children with other disabilities showed a relative improvement. In addition, larger improvements in receptive vocabulary were associated with use of oral communication only. Conclusions: The results suggest that type of AD can be used to gauge expected language development in the population of children with hearing loss and ADs when formal assessment of cognitive ability is not feasible.",
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Cupples, L, Ching, TYC, Leigh, G, Martin, L, Gunnourie, M, Button, L, Marnane, V, Hou, S, Zhang, V, Flynn, C & Van Buynder, P 2018, 'Language development in deaf or hard-of-hearing children with additional disabilities: type matters!' Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, vol 62, no. 6, pp. 532-543. DOI: 10.1111/jir.12493

Language development in deaf or hard-of-hearing children with additional disabilities : type matters! / Cupples, L.; Ching, T. Y.C.; Leigh, G.; Martin, L.; Gunnourie, M.; Button, L.; Marnane, V.; Hou, S.; Zhang, V.; Flynn, C.; Van Buynder, P.

In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Vol. 62, No. 6, 06.2018, p. 532-543.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Leigh,G.

AU - Martin,L.

AU - Gunnourie,M.

AU - Button,L.

AU - Marnane,V.

AU - Hou,S.

AU - Zhang,V.

AU - Flynn,C.

AU - Van Buynder,P.

PY - 2018/6

Y1 - 2018/6

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