Language learning strategy use: Perceptions of female Arab English majors

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Abstract

This study investigated the patterns of language learning strategy use among 120 female Arabic-speaking students majoring in English at a university in Qatar. Perceptions of strategy use were measured by the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL, ESL/EFL Student Version). The study found that (1) this group of EFL learners featured medium bordering on high strategy users with an overall mean of 3.46 out of 5; (2) strategy categories were used in the order of metacognitive, cognitive, compensation, social, memory, and affective; (3) freshmen students reported the highest rate of strategy use with a mean of 3.64; and (4) except for compensation strategies, results did not show any significant difference among four educational levels regarding the use of strategy categories.

LanguageEnglish
Pages433-440
Number of pages8
JournalForeign Language Annals
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

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title = "Language learning strategy use: Perceptions of female Arab English majors",
abstract = "This study investigated the patterns of language learning strategy use among 120 female Arabic-speaking students majoring in English at a university in Qatar. Perceptions of strategy use were measured by the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL, ESL/EFL Student Version). The study found that (1) this group of EFL learners featured medium bordering on high strategy users with an overall mean of 3.46 out of 5; (2) strategy categories were used in the order of metacognitive, cognitive, compensation, social, memory, and affective; (3) freshmen students reported the highest rate of strategy use with a mean of 3.64; and (4) except for compensation strategies, results did not show any significant difference among four educational levels regarding the use of strategy categories.",
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Language learning strategy use : Perceptions of female Arab English majors. / Riazi, Abdolmehdi.

In: Foreign Language Annals, Vol. 40, No. 3, 09.2007, p. 433-440.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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