Level of automation

effects on train driver vigilance

Peter Spring, Andrew Mcintosh, Carlo Caponecchia, Melissa Baysari

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

This study reports preliminary results from the first of a series of experiments that aims to: examine the effects various levels of train driving automation may have on a number of human factor issues; assess the impact of these human factor issues on driver performance in terms of safety and efficiency; and explore possible methods of reducing these automation effects, if shown to be detrimental to driving performance. In this experiment, student participants were trained to drive a low-fidelity computer simulated passenger train on an intercity route. Vigilance task performance was measured as the distance along the track between the detection point of a safety critical event and the event object position, and was obtained while manipulating two IVs: between-subjects variable - Level-Of-Automation (LOA), having four levels: nil, low, intermediate, and high; and within-subjects variable -time-on-task, having two levels: safety critical event onset before 10 (Early) and after 60 (Late) minutes of driving. A Rail Signal Failure was used as a low salience safety critical event to be detected. It was predicted that: (1) driver vigilance would be poorest at higher levels of train automation; and (2) a vigilance decrement would occur over extended driving periods and this decrement would be more pronounced at higher levels of train automation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication44th Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2008, HFESA 2008
Place of PublicationAdelaide, SA, Australia
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society
Pages264-271
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9781615674039
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Event44th Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2008, HFESA 2008 - Adelaide, SA, Australia
Duration: 17 Nov 200819 Nov 2008

Other

Other44th Annual Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference 2008, HFESA 2008
CountryAustralia
CityAdelaide, SA
Period17/11/0819/11/08

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