Linking grazing to inhibition and goal-directed behaviour in obesity with and without eating disorder features

Andreea I. Heriseanu, Phillipa Hay, Stephen Touyz

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Recent models of obesity and eating behaviour have implicated both automatic responding to food-related cues and executive functioning in driving dietary choice. This study aimed to relate grazing severity to high weight with and without significant eating disorder features via the effects of inhibition and degree of goal-directed behaviour, in persons with obesity with and without significant eating disorder features compared to healthy controls. Forty-four participants with obesity (43.1% endorsing marked eating disorder features), and 43 healthy-weight age- and sex-matched participants (N = 87; 67.8% female, age = 28.57 (8.70; 18.18–58.34) years, BMI = 29.18 (7.80; 18.65–51.95) kg/m2) completed demographic and eating disorder-related questionnaires, a neuropsychological task of inhibition and an instrumental decision-making task. Bootstrapped serial mediation analyses were performed to examine the effect of group on grazing via goal-directed behaviour and inhibition. While significant differences existed between the groups in terms of inhibition, goal-directed behaviour and grazing severity, the effect of group on grazing severity was not found to be mediated by the degree of behavioural goal-directedness and inhibition. Therefore, :in persons with obesity with or without eating disorder symptoms, putative relationships between a reduced inhibitory profile and/or behaviour that is less flexible and goal-directed and eating behaviours such as grazing, remain unclear.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalBehaviour Change
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Sep 2020

    Keywords

    • eating disorders
    • goal-directed behaviour
    • grazing
    • instrumental behaviour
    • mediation
    • obesity

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