Local governments and social enterprise: meeting community challenges together?

Catherine Hastings*, John Weate

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Even though the role of local government was established in Australia in the early nineteenth century as a mechanism for tailored local service delivery provision within a narrow range of administrative functions, since World War II, local government’s roles have expanded to include town-planning and a range of welfare and leisure services that have continued to diversify to the present day. Expansion in function has not been matched by expansion in funding, with this being a particular issue in rural and regional councils. A result of these pressures has been increased interest in new models of networked governance, involving more players in the process of service delivery so that local governments are not required to ‘go it alone’. Social enterprises have increasingly been included as one of these other players, but there has been limited discussion in the literature about the roles social enterprises are playing for councils. This chapter situates an analysis of local government-social enterprise relationships within the theoretical frameworks of network governance and public value, with reference to examples of such relationships in regional New South Wales (NSW). It aims to stimulate discussion about the possibilities for local government-social enterprise relationships to deliver positive social and economic outcomes within regional Australia.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSocial capital and enterprise in the modern state
EditorsÉidín Ní Shé, Lorelle J. Burton, Patrick Alan Danaher
Place of PublicationCham
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages117-146
Number of pages30
ISBN (Electronic)9783319681153
ISBN (Print)9783319681146
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Local government
  • Network governance
  • Place-shaping
  • Public value
  • Regional Australia
  • Social enterprise
  • Social procurement

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