Long-term outcomes of an Australian universal prevention trial of anxiety and depression symptoms in children and youth: An evaluation of the friends program

Paula M. Barrett, Lara J. Farrell*, Thomas H. Ollendick, Mark Dadds

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

180 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated the long-term effectiveness of the FRIENDS Program in reducing anxiety and depression in a sample of children from Grade 6 and Grade 9 in comparison to a control condition. Longitudinal data for Lock and Barrett's (2003) universal prevention trial is presented, along with data from 12-month follow-up to 24-and 36-month follow-up. Results of this study indicate that intervention reductions in anxiety reported in Lock and Barrett were maintained for students in Grade 6, with the intervention group reporting significantly lower ratings of anxiety at long-term follow-up. A significant Time × Intervention Group x Gender Effect on Anxiety was found, with girls in the intervention group reporting significantly lower anxiety at 12-month and 24-month follow-up but not at 36-month follow-up in comparison to the control condition. Results demonstrated a prevention effect with significantly fewer high-risk students at 36-month follow-up in the intervention condition than in the control condition. Results are discussed within the context of prevention research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)403-411
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

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