Longitudinal co-variations between inflammatory cytokines, lung function and patient reported outcomes in patients with asthma

Karin Lodin*, Mats Lekander, Jörgen Syk, Kjell Alving, Predrag Petrovic, Anna Andreasson

*Corresponding author for this work

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    Abstract

    Background: Asthma is a chronic inflammatory respiratory disorder associated with reduced lung function and poor quality of life. The condition is also associated with poor self-rated health, a major predictor of objective health trajectories. Of biological correlates to self-rated health, evidence suggests a role for inflammatory cytokines and related sickness behaviours. However, this is mainly based on cross-sectional data, and the relation has not been investigated in patients with chronic inflammatory conditions. Objective: To investigate inflammatory cytokines, lung function, sickness behaviour and asthma-related quality of life as determinants of self-rated health in patients with asthma, and to investigate if these variables co-vary over time. Methods: Plasma cytokines (IL-5, IL-6), lung function (FEV1), sickness behaviour, asthma-related quality of life and self-rated health were assessed in 181 patients with allergic asthma aged 18–64 years in a one-year longitudinal study. Mixed effect regression models and Spearman’s correlation were performed to analyse the associations between repeated measurements. Results: More sickness behaviour and poorer asthma-related quality of life were associated with poorer self-rated health (p’s<0.001). In men, both low and high levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and poorer lung function were related with poorer self-rated health (p’s<0.05). Over the year, improved asthma-related quality of life was associated with better self-rated health (Spearman’s rho = -0.34 women,-0.36 men, p’s<0.01). Further, if sickness behaviour decreased, self-rated health improved, but only in women (Rho = -0.21, p<0.05). Increased FEV1 in men was associated with an increase in IL-6 (Rho = 0.24, p<0.05) as well as improved self-rated health (Rho = -0.21, p<0.05) and asthma-related quality of life (Rho = 0.29, p<0.01) over the year. Conclusion: The study highlights the importance of subjectively perceived sickness behaviour and asthma-related quality of life together with lung function as determinants of self-rated health in asthmatic patients. The importance of inflammatory activation for patient reported outcomes in chronic inflammatory conditions need further investigation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere0185019
    Pages (from-to)1-16
    Number of pages16
    JournalPLoS ONE
    Volume12
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 15 Sep 2017

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright the Author(s) 2017. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

    Correction found at Lodin K, Lekander M, Syk J, Alving K, Petrovic P, Andreasson A (2018) Correction: Longitudinal co-variations between inflammatory cytokines, lung function and patient reported outcomes in patients with asthma. PLoS ONE 13(5): e0197795. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0197795

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