Low Incident Light Combined with Partial Waterlogging Impairs Photosynthesis and Imposes a Yield Penalty in Cotton

U. Najeeb*, M. P. Bange, B. J. Atwell, D. K Y Tan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Through field studies, cotton responses to dual stresses – waterlogging and low light (shade) were investigated. The hypothesis was that shade would amplify yield losses in waterlogged (WL) cotton. Either early or late in the reproductive phase, the crop was WL (96 h and 120 h, in 2012–2013 and 2013–2014, respectively) and/or shaded (6 days or 9 days in 2012–2013 and 2013–2014, respectively). Waterlogging at early reproductive phase significantly reduced lint yield (17 % averaged across both years) of cotton, although shade-induced yield losses (18 %) were only significant in 2013–2014. Shade significantly exacerbated yield losses only when the impact of waterlogging damage was modest (2013–2014). More intense waterlogging impaired lint yield independently of the light levels. Yield reductions in these experiments were the consequence of both accelerated fruit abscission and fewer fruiting nodes produced. Plants had lower leaf nitrogen levels and photosynthetic rates after waterlogging and/or shade treatments and produced fewer fruiting nodes. Although long-term shade increased specific leaf area (30 %) and leaf N (20 %) immediately following 5 days of waterlogging, it did not restore shoot growth, node formation or lint yield because of suppressed photosynthetic performance (area basis) and carbohydrate supply.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-341
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Agronomy and Crop Science
Volume202
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2016

Keywords

  • fruit abscission
  • gas exchange
  • leaf morphology
  • leaf nitrogen
  • reproductive phase

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