Low-level deficits in beat perception: neither necessary nor sufficient for explaining developmental dyslexia in a consistent orthography

Timothy C. Papadopoulos*, George K. Georgiou, Rauno K. Parrila

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reports two different studies examining the theoretical account of low-level deficits in beat perception as an alternative explanation of developmental dyslexia in Greek, an orthographically consistent language. Study I examined the relationship of amplitude rise time and frequency discrimination with measures of phonological processing, working memory, and reading fluency in a large unselected sample of Grade 4 children. Study II examined the presence of beat perception deficits in groups of Grade 2, 4, and 6 children with dyslexia and their chronological age controls. The results provided no evidence to support meaningful associations between beat perception tasks and reading or the theoretical account of beat perception deficits as a sufficient explanation or contributing factor to dyslexia. Implications on the importance of auditory processing in reading in orthographically consistent languages are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1841-1856
Number of pages16
JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • auditory processing
  • beat detection
  • dyslexia
  • orthographically consistent language
  • reading

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