Major findings of the LOCHI study on children at 3 years of age and implications for audiological management

Teresa Y. C. Ching*, Harvey Dillon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This article describes the major findings of the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study. Design: A population-based prospective cohort study; with randomized controlled trials of hearing aid prescription and non-linear frequency compression. Sample: 451 children in New South Wales, Victoria and Southern Queensland. Results: Significant predictors of language outcomes at 3 years of age included severity of hearing loss, gender, presence of additional disabilities, maternal education, and age at cochlear implantation. Although prescription did not have a significant effect on outcomes, its influence on loudness and hearing aid safety has implications for management. After controlling for a range of predictor variables, nonlinear frequency compression did not have a significant effect on outcomes. For the same hearing sensitivity, the presence of auditory neuropathy did not have a significant effect on outcomes. Conclusions: These findings form the basis for evidence-based guidelines for management of children with hearing loss.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S65-S68
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Audiology
Volume52
Issue numberS2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder
  • Children with hearing loss
  • Hearing aid prescription
  • Language outcomes
  • Nonlinear frequency compression

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