Marine diatoms as indicators of modern changes in oceanographic conditions

Oscar E. Romero, Leanne K. Armand

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    39 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Marine diatoms as indicators of modern environment change A substantial part of the ocean’s primary productivity is provided by diatoms (Tréguer et al., 1995). In general, they are the dominant primary producers in temperate and cold areas, and are very abundant in the recently upwelled waters of Eastern Boundary Currents and in diverging surface currents where nutrients are brought to the surface (Nelson et al., 1995, and references therein). On an annual basis, the relative contribution of diatoms to primary productivity is highly variable: Nelson et al. (1995) and Tréguer et al. (1995) proposed upper limits of 35% in oligotrophic areas and up to 75% in coastal upwelling areas and other nutrient-rich systems. Regardless of the area, the general trend is for an increase in the relative abundance of diatoms in the phytoplankton together with primary productivity (Ragueneau et al., 2000). As a general statement we may say that diatoms are the dominant primary producers in a number of oceanographic settings that offer both the required high-nutrient and turbulence conditions (e.g. coastal upwelling areas, equatorial divergences, ice-edges, river plumes; Ragueneau et al., 2000). In contrast, small, non-siliceous pico- and nanoplankton are of great importance to total productivity in oligotrophic regions (Tréguer et al., 1995, and references therein).

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe Diatoms
    Subtitle of host publicationApplications for the Environmental and Earth Sciences, Second Edition
    EditorsJohn P. Smol, Eugene F. Stoermer
    Place of PublicationCambridge
    PublisherCambridge University Press
    Pages373-400
    Number of pages28
    Edition2nd
    ISBN (Electronic)9780511763175
    ISBN (Print)9780521509961
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010

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