Market entry decisions of transnational universities: an Australian case study

Mark Tayar, Robert Jack

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

As examples of knowledge-intensive services, Australian universities have pursued non-equity entry modes to deliver courses transnationally. Through a case study investigation of four Australian universities, this study evaluates the perceptions and entry decisions of university managers. From the market selection, entry mode and higher education literature, a conceptual model, embedded with 4 propositions, is presented. The model sees market selection and entry mode as inter-dependent decisions which are influenced by manager and university motives, risk-aversity, and host government constraints in a gradual process of internationalisation. Among our key findings are that profitability is not a driver for university internationalisation and, due to a culture of risk-aversity, universities prefer zero-equity modes unless risk can be minimised or accommodated through suitable hedging strategies.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationChallenges for international business in a turbulent global environment
Subtitle of host publicationproceedings of the ANZIBA Annual Conference 2011
EditorsCherrie Jiuhua Zhu
Place of PublicationMulgrave, VIC
PublisherANZIBA
Number of pages26
ISBN (Print)9780980789911
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventAustralia & New Zealand International Business Academy Annual Conference - Melbourne
Duration: 28 Apr 201130 Apr 2011

Conference

ConferenceAustralia & New Zealand International Business Academy Annual Conference
CityMelbourne
Period28/04/1130/04/11

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