Masked repetition priming and word frequency effects across different types of Japanese scripts: an examination of the lexical activation account

Yasushi Hino*, Stephen J. Lupker, Taeko Ogawa, Christopher R. Sears

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    17 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In these experiments, cross-script masked repetition priming and word frequency effects were examined for Japanese words and nonwords as a function of script familiarity and the nature of the task (lexical decision or naming). In the lexical decision task, masked repetition priming effects were observed only for word targets and those effects were larger for targets presented in an orthographically unfamiliar script than for targets presented in an orthographically familiar script. In contrast, in the naming task, masked repetition priming effects were observed for both word and nonword targets and, for word targets, the repetition priming effects were similar regardless of the orthographic familiarity of the targets. In addition, large word frequency effects were observed when the targets were presented in a familiar script, but the effects were diminished or eliminated when the targets were presented in an unfamiliar script in both tasks. Implications of these results are discussed in terms of the possible loci of the priming effects in the two tasks.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)33-66
    Number of pages34
    JournalJournal of Memory and Language
    Volume48
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2003

    Keywords

    • Abstract lexical Units
    • Cross-script masked repetition priming
    • Lexical activation
    • Phonological activation
    • Script familiarity

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