Maskless patterned etching of silicon dioxide by inkjet printing

Alison Lennon*, Anita Ho-Baillie, Stuart Wenham

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A method of directly patterning silicon dioxide layers without the use of a mask is described. The method uses an inkjet device for the patterned deposition of a solution containing fluoride ions onto an acidic water-soluble polymer layer formed over the silicon dioxide. The deposited solution reacts with the polymer layer, at the locations where it is deposited, to form an active etchant that etches the silicon dioxide under the polymer layer to form a pattern of openings in the dielectric layer. The resulting patterned silicon dioxide layer can be used to facilitate local diffusions and metal contacts to the underlying silicon, or to enable etching of the underlying silicon. The method requires small amounts of chemicals and produces significantly less hazardous chemical waste than existing immersion etching methods.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2008 Conference on Optoelectronic and Microelectronic Materials and Devices
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages170-173
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781424427178
ISBN (Print)9781424427161
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event2008 Conference on Optoelectronic and Microelectronic Materials and Devices, COMMAD'08 - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: 28 Jul 20081 Aug 2008

Publication series

Name
ISSN (Print)1097-2137
ISSN (Electronic)2377-5505

Conference

Conference2008 Conference on Optoelectronic and Microelectronic Materials and Devices, COMMAD'08
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period28/07/081/08/08

Keywords

  • etching
  • silicon dioxide
  • dielectric
  • inkjet printing

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