Maximising eyeballs but facilitating cybercrime? Ethical challenges for online advertising in New Zealand

Paul A. Watters, Maya F. Watters, Jacqueline Ziegler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rogue websites support their operations through advertising, where advertising networks facilitate the placement of advertising banners paid for by advertisers who seek the most 'relevant' eyeballs. While mainstream advertisers risk harm to their brands by being associated with illicit activities on the internet, they also risk harms to users through the co-location of ads for high-risk activities, such as gambling, pornography, and scams. In this paper, we present a quantitative analysis of high risk and mainstream advertising being served to New Zealand consumers. We explore the ethical challenges facing advertisers and advertising networks in potentially facilitating cybercrime and harms to users, in the context of theories of marketing ethics. These theories can be used to explore policy and individual responses to guide ethical conduct in marketing.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2015
EditorsTung X. Bui, Ralph H. Sprague
Place of PublicationPiscataway, USA
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages1742-1749
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781479973675
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2015 - Kauai, United States
Duration: 5 Jan 20158 Jan 2015

Other

Other48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2015
CountryUnited States
CityKauai
Period5/01/158/01/15

Keywords

  • Advertising
  • High risk
  • Malware
  • Marketing
  • Sex industry

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Maximising eyeballs but facilitating cybercrime? Ethical challenges for online advertising in New Zealand'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this