Me, my selfie, and I: the relationship between editing and posting selfies and body dissatisfaction in men and women

Alexandra Rhodes Lonergan*, Kay Bussey, Jonathan Mond, Olivia Brown, Scott Giffiths, Stuart B. Muray, Deborah Mitchison

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Factors that promote versus protect against body dissatisfaction remain unclear. Social media may be a risk factor, particularly given ubiquitous engagement among young people, and the pervasive use of “selfies.” Conversely, self-compassion has received attention as a protective factor against body dissatisfaction. This study examined: (a) the relationships between “manipulation” of selfies posted online, “investment” in others’ responses to selfies, and body dissatisfaction; and (b) whether self-compassion moderated the relationships between social media variables and body dissatisfaction. Results from 184 Australian men (n = 89) and women (n = 95) suggested that social media variables photo manipulation and investment were associated with greater body dissatisfaction for both genders. Self-compassion did not moderate these relationships. Findings suggest that manipulation and concern about selfies posted may be risk correlates for body dissatisfaction in men and women. Further research is needed to investigate protective factors against body dissatisfaction in an online environment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-43
Number of pages5
JournalBody Image
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019

Keywords

  • body image
  • gender
  • selfies
  • self-compassion
  • social media

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