Measurement of serum levels of macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 combined with prostate-specific antigen improves prostate cancer diagnosis

David A. Brown, Carsten Stephan, Robyn L. Ward, Mathew Law, Mark Hunter, Asne R. Bauskin, Janaki Amin, Klaus Jung, Eleftherios P. Diamandis, Garret M. Hampton, Pamela J. Russell, Graham G. Giles, Samuel N. Breit*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Current serum testing for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) lacks specificity. On diagnosis, the optimal therapeutic pathway is not clear and tools for adequate risk assessment of localized PCa progression are not available. This leads to a significant number of men having unnecessary diagnostic biopsies and surgery. A search for novel tumor markers identified macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1) as a potentially useful marker. Follow-up studies revealed MIC-1 overexpression in local and metastatic PCa whereas peritumoral interstitial staining for MIC-1 identified lower-grade tumors destined for recurrence. Consequently, we sought to assess serum MIC-1 measurement as a diagnostic tool. Experimental Design: Using immunoassay determination of serum MIC-1 concentration in 1,000 men, 538 of whom had PCa, we defined the relationship of MIC-1 to disease variables. A diagnostic algorithm (MIC-PSA score) based on serum levels of MIC-1, total serum prostate-specific antigen, and percentage of free prostate-specific antigen was developed. Results: Serum MIC-1 was found to be an independent predictor of the presence of PCa and tumors with a Gleason sum ≥7. We validated the MIC-PSA score in a separate population and showed an improved specificity for diagnostic blood testing for PCa over percentage of free prostate-specific antigen, potentially reducing unnecessary biopsies by 27%. Conclusions: Serum MIC-1 is an independent marker of the presence of PCa and tumors with a Gleason sum of ≥7. The use of serum MIC-1 significantly increases diagnostic specificity and may be a future tool in the management of PCa.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-96
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2006
Externally publishedYes

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