Measuring diagnostic skills through the utilization of cues

Mark W. Wiggins*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The aim of this paper is to outline a theoretical and empirical case for the role of cue utilization in the cognitive process of diagnosis. Drawing on theories of skill acquisition, the case is made that the utilization of cues represents a critical precursor to the progression toward expertise but that the acquisition and utilization of cues is dependent upon a repertoire of cases and exemplars that have been acquired during the progression from novice to competence. Cases and exemplars form the basis of a mental model from which cues, in the form or feature-event or feature-object relationships, can be identified and retained in memory. The implications of a more sophisticated understanding of the role of cue utilization in skill acquisition will provide the foundation for more effective and more efficient industrial training systems in the future.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication2014 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
    Place of PublicationChicago
    PublisherSAGE/Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
    Pages2345-2349
    Number of pages5
    Volume58
    ISBN (Electronic)9780945289456
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    Event58th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Chicago, United States
    Duration: 27 Oct 201431 Oct 2014

    Publication series

    NameHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting Proceedings
    PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society
    ISSN (Print)1541-9312

    Other

    Other58th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
    CountryUnited States
    CityChicago
    Period27/10/1431/10/14

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