MEASURING PATIENTS' EXPERIENCED QUALITY OF LIFE: THE APPLICATION OF CONTENT ANALYSIS SCALES IN HEALTH CARE

Linda L. Viney*, Mary T. Westbrook

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several scales that are useful in research concerning patients' experienced (as distinct from observed) quality of life have been developed. They use content analysis and so can be applied to any recorded verbal communication from individual patients. They provide indices of psychoanalysis‐based concepts of anxiety and hostility, as well as of positive feelings. Whether patients experience themselves as helpless or in control of a situation and whether patients experience themselves as having social support—phenomenology‐based concepts—are also measured. Some examples of applications of these scales in health care are given together with data from 381 patients and ex‐patients. Uses of the scales include obtaining information about common patterns of patient experiences, psychologically “at risk” patients, factors which precipitate surgery visits and patients' reaction to specific illnesses and treatments. They can also be employed in evaluations of rehabilitation, treatment and prevention programs. 1981 Public Health Association of Australia

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-52
Number of pages8
JournalCommunity Health Studies
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1981
Externally publishedYes

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