Measuring state pre-event and post-event rumination in Social Anxiety Disorder: psychometric properties of the Socially Anxious Rumination Questionnaire (SARQ)

Hayley E. Donohue, Ronald M. Rapee, Matthew Modini, Alice R. Norton, Maree J. Abbott*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cognitive models have consistently recognised pre-event and post-event rumination as maintaining factors in Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). This study aimed to investigate the psychometric properties of a state-based measure of pre-event and post-event rumination in SAD: The Socially Anxious Rumination Questionnaire (SARQ), which was formerly known as the Thoughts Questionnaire. In particular, we examined the factor structure, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, sensitivity to treatment response, clinical cut-off scores (relative to non-clinical participants), and associated test performance indicators of the SARQ. The sample comprised 505 adults with a principal diagnosis of SAD and 130 non-clinical controls. Pre-event and post-event rumination were assessed in relation to a three-minute impromptu speech. Results indicated single factors for the SARQ: Pre-event and SARQ: Post-event scales, along with excellent internal consistency, good test-retest reliability, sound sensitivity to cognitive-behavioural treatment response, and a clear ability to discriminate between individuals with a principal diagnosis of SAD and non-clinical controls. The findings justify the SARQ's use as a robust and reliable measure of state rumination for individuals with SAD that can be used both before and after encountering a social threat.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102452
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume82
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • pre-event rumination
  • post-event rumination
  • Social Anxiety Disorder
  • Socially Anxious Rumination Questionnaire

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