Medicean metamorphoses: Carnival in Florence, 1513

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In early February 1513, the recently restored Medici family celebrated Carnival in Florence with two elaborate, allegorical triumphs. As moments of ephemeral, public ritual these triumphs provided a unique opportunity for the Medici to negotiate their position in the city and their relationship to the government, to tell a story about themselves. The images and concepts presented in the Carnival depicted the Medici as peacemakers and defenders of Florentine liberty. This central conceit later became significant in the family's iconography even as they transformed themselves into titled princes of the city and dismantled the republican government.

LanguageEnglish
Pages491-510
Number of pages20
JournalRenaissance Studies
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011

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carnival
religious behavior
Medici
Government
Carnival
Florence
Metamorphoses
Ephemeral
Republican
Defenders
Conceit
Iconography
Liberty
Medici Family

Keywords

  • Florence
  • political culture
  • ritual

Cite this

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Medicean metamorphoses : Carnival in Florence, 1513. / Baker, Nicholas Scott.

In: Renaissance Studies, Vol. 25, No. 4, 09.2011, p. 491-510.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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