Message from the dual orthographic lexica view: reports of my death are greatly exaggerated

I. Simpson, L. Cupples

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

    Abstract

    How do we read and spell words? The prevailing view is that we possess one orthographic lexicon which allows us to both recognise and spell words. An alternative view suggests that there may be one orthographic lexicon used to recognise written words and a separate orthographic lexicon used for producing words (writing, oral spelling). For well known, familiar words, there should be a strong entry in both lexica. For unfamiliar words though, the entries may differ in ‘strength’ and ‘clarity’, leading to performance differences in reading and spelling of the same word. This talk summarises findings from experiments designed to detect such differences. If found, these differences would suggest that two orthographic lexica may actually exist.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)12
    Number of pages1
    JournalAustralian Journal of Psychology
    Volume58
    Issue numberSuppl. 1
    Publication statusPublished - 2006
    EventAustralian language and speech conference (15th : 2005) - North Ryde, NSW
    Duration: 15 Dec 200516 Dec 2005

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