Metacognitive reading and study strategies and academic achievement of university students with and without a history of reading difficulties

Bradley W. Bergey, S. Hélène Deacon, Rauno K. Parrila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

University students who report a history of reading difficulties have been demonstrated to have poorer word reading and reading comprehension skills than their peers; yet, without a diagnosed learning disability, these students do not have access to the same support services, potentially placing them at academic risk. This study provides a comprehensive investigation of first-year academic achievement for students with a history of reading difficulties (n = 244) compared to students with no such history (n = 603). We also examine reported use of metacognitive reading and study strategies and their relations with GPA. Results indicate that students with a history of reading difficulties earn lower GPA and successfully complete fewer credits compared to students with no history of reading difficulty. These patterns varied somewhat by faculty of study. Students with a history of reading difficulties also reported lower scores across multiple metacognitive reading and study strategy scales, yet these scores were not associated with their academic performance. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of identifying students with a history of reading difficulties and that commonly used study strategy inventories have limited value in predicting their academic success.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-94
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Learning Disabilities
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adults
  • at risk/prevention
  • metacognition

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