Methadone disrupts performance on the working memory version of the Morris water task

Ilana J. Hepner, Judi Homewood*, Alan J. Taylor

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    27 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The aim of the study was to examine if administration of the μ-opiate agonist methadone hydrochloride resulted in deficits in performance on the Morris water tank task, a widely used test of spatial cognition. To this end, after initial training on the task, Long-Evans rats were administered saline or methadone at either 1.25, 2.5 or 5 mg/kg ip 15 min prior to testing. The performance of the highest-dose methadone group was inferior to that of the controls on the working memory version of the Morris task. There were also differences between the groups on the reference memory version of the task, but this result cannot be considered reliable. These data show that methadone has its most profound effect on cognition in rats when efficient performance on the task requires attention to and retention of new information, in this case, the relationship between platform location and the extramaze cues.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)41-49
    Number of pages9
    JournalPhysiology and Behavior
    Volume76
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2002

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